Author Archives: EVENOR - TECH

Europe approves Nature Restoration Act

Europe approves Nature Restoration Act

The European Commission has just drafted a new Nature Restoration Act (22 th June) that will be a key step towards nature restoration in all member countries. The aim of repairing 80% of habitats in poor environmental condition to restore nature in all ecosystems, including forests, agricultural land, marine ecosystems and urban environments.

Europe approves Nature Restoration Act
Europe approves Nature Restoration Act

The proposal, which takes the form of a draft regulation, defines a number of key concepts and sets legally binding targets for nature restoration by 2050. 

Because this law will help to ensure the resilience and safety of the food supply in the European Union and thus worldwide.

And this means that Member States will have to draw up their own national restoration plans and carry out the necessary work to identify the restoration measures needed to meet the targets and obligations.

Naturally, the Nature Restoration Act will apply to all Member States legally binding targets for nature restoration in different ecosystems that will complement existing legislation. 

Europe approves Nature Restoration Act
Europe approves Nature Restoration Act

According to the report presented by the conservation organisation WWF, the recovery of degraded natural spaces would favour the absorption of some 300 million tonnes of carbon dioxide per year. This is equivalent to Spain’s annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. 

And according to press reports, there have been obstacles to the project, as there are entities that wanted to lower their restrictions, which has led to a continuous postponement of the presentation of the project.

As European Commission vice-president Frans Timmermans said “Some see war as a perfect excuse to curb” biodiversity and ecological farming practices.

Kontrakty na dostarczanie rolno-środowiskowych dóbr publicznych w rolnictwie - doświadczenia i wyzwania" – podsumowanie wyników projektu CONSOLE

Kontrakty na dostarczanie rolno-środowiskowych dóbr publicznych w rolnictwie – doświadczenia i wyzwania” – podsumowanie wyników projektu CONSOLE

On May 10th 2022, the Institute of Economics and Finance, organized organized a special session devoted to contracts for the provision of agri-environmental public goods in agriculture. The topics which were discussed during the event covered: the concept, scope and delivery of AECPG in agriculture, contract types, opinions of farmers and stakeholders in Poland and selected other EU countries on the possibilities of implementation of the contracts, and finally how to increase the prevalence of contracts for the provision of AECPG in agriculture in Europe. The main conclusions from the discussion were that possibilities and effectiveness of contracts largely depend on who will be the initiator and whether foreseen benefits will be satisfactory for farmers. The AECPG contract should provide an appropriate compensation for the farmer for his/her activities or obtained results. 

  • Kontrakty na dostarczanie rolno-środowiskowych dóbr publicznych w rolnictwie - doświadczenia i wyzwania" – podsumowanie wyników projektu CONSOLE
    Kontrakty na dostarczanie rolno-środowiskowych dóbr publicznych w rolnictwie - doświadczenia i wyzwania" – podsumowanie wyników projektu CONSOLE
Drought grips northern Italy. Source: https://www.copernicus.eu

Where is the flow of the river Po?

The River PO is known as one of the most important rivers in northern Italy, flowing, as if carefully drawn with a ruler, from west to east; from the Alps to the Adriatic Sea (652 kilometers), and empties into the delta near the city of Venice.

Well, this week, the media have echoed that it has presented a flow so low that its people can walk without getting wet and sunken ships appear.

This is the worst drought that this region has suffered in its last 70 years, with a more than significant reduction during the spring and an increase in temperatures in recent weeks (two degrees above the usual averages in the area).

And this drought makes those who live from agricultural production suffer and there is already talk of completely destroyed crops such as the “late tomato” or other vegetables that cannot even be planted without irrigation. Between 30% and 40% less melons and watermelons and 50% corn and soybeans are expected to be harvested due to problems, as well as in the harvesting of rice, which represents 50% of the country’s production.

Stefano Patuanelli himself, Minister of Agriculture, has stated that the declaration of a state of crisis is “inevitable”

 

For what is this?

According to a report published in March by the Copernicus World Drought Observatory, the severe drought in northern Italy and the PO River basin in particular is related to a persistent lack of rainfall since December 2021.

Severe rainfall deficits and low snow accumulation (40% below average 2009-2021 conditions) in the Southern Alps have contributed to low-water rivers. Drying of rivers in the area has made large swathes of the riverbed visible, so much so that a World War II-era German tank recently resurfaced.

Drought grips northern Italy. Source: https://www.copernicus.eu
Drought grips northern Italy. Source: https://www.copernicus.eu

CONSOLE: project’s results and good practices in farms engaged in agro-enviromental measures and organic production under 2014-2020 RDP

CONSOLE: project’s results and good practices in farms engaged in agro-enviromental measures and organic production under 2014-2020 RDP

On May 30, 2022, from the UNIBO and RER, organized the roadshow as part of the CONSOLE project.

The Roadshow started with a presentation by Giampietro Sabbatani, director of the host farm CAB Massari, a cooperative which is currently engaged with a wide range of agri-climate-environmental measures and with investment measures for environmental objectives of rural development. 

Then, the main results of the CONSOLE project have been presented by the University of Bologna. 

At the end of the presentations, a guided tour took place to show some ecological elements and practices (hedges, set aside for environmental scope, etc..); in particular, the following activities were illustrated: 

  • no productive agricultural land like wetlands and other characteristic elements of the agricultural landscape such as groves and hedges, situated, since the 90s, among the cultivated fields, to separate organic production from conventional or integrated production; 
  • combination of organic beet crops and mustard crops; 
  • mowing grass to protect insects but also the production in the organic orchards; 
  • Dairy cattle feeding without silage;
  • production of organic fertilizers by recycling effluents and dedicate crops with biodigester.

During the buffet lunch, advantages and criticalities related to the interventions illustrated have been discussed.

  • Figure 1. The presentation a cooperative reality by the director of the host farm CAB Massari
    Figure 1. The presentation a cooperative reality by the director of the host farm CAB Massari
  1. Figure 1. The presentation a cooperative reality by the director of the host farm CAB Massari
  2. Figure 2. The presentation of the main results of the CONSOLE project by the UNIBO (prof. Davide Viaggi, dr. Stefano Targetti and RER (dr. Gianfranco De Geronimo)
  3. Figure 3. The consociation between organic beet crops and mustard crops
  4. Figure 4. The wetlands and the characteristic features of the agricultural landscape such as groves and hedges

The Roadshow opened with a presentation given by the director of the host farm CAB Massari. The latter is a cooperative currently engaging a large proportion of agricultural area in several agri-climate-environmental measures of rural development and investment measures for environmental objectives. Successively, the University of Bologna presented some of the main results of the CONSOLE project. Afterwards, a guided tour took place with the aim to show some activities and ecological endowments of the farm. The following activities were illustrated: the wetlands and the characteristic features of the agricultural landscape, such as groves and hedges that, since the 1990s, separate organic productions from conventional and/or integrated areas; the consociation between organic beet crops and mustard crops; organic orchards and organic farming; the production of organic milk without the use of silage. The event ended with a lunch that was an opportunity to discuss advantages and criticalities related to the illustrated interventions. 

Lessons learned from a 13-country experiment on agri-environment public goods- CONSOLE

Lessons learned from a 13-country experiment on agri-environment public goods- CONSOLE

On May 11, 2022, from the University of Leeds and iCASP organized the roadshow as part of the CONSOLE project.

The event took place at Hebden Bridge in the Upper Calder Valley in West Yorkshire, England. The Roadshow aimed to inform participants about the CONSOLE project and to present the results of surveys conducted among landowners, stakeholders in the 13 countries.

Figure1: Dr Emmanouil Tyllianakis presenting the13-country result
Figure1: Dr Emmanouil Tyllianakis presenting the13-country result

The meeting discussed the increased adoption of results-based agri-environmental schemes and advocated for farmers to enroll in short-term contracts with adequate (higher) payments than other agri-environmental contracts, with simple contract requirements and with the support of independent consultants and organizations as a means to achieve this goal.

Figure 2: Dr Emmanouil Tyllianakis facilitating discussion regarding contract solutions examined in CONSOLE
Figure 2: Dr Emmanouil Tyllianakis facilitating discussion regarding contract solutions examined in CONSOLE

Conclusions

The Roadshow aimed to inform participants about the CONSOLE project and to present the results of surveys conducted among landowners, stakeholders in the 13 countries. Case studies were presented, such as: the humus-Program of the Ökoregion Kaindorf, Austria and the delivering multiple environmental benefits in the south Pennines, United Kingdom. In addition, views were shared on how value chain and collective implementation contracts seem more feasible for this group (participants were members of the CONSOLE UK1 case study from WP2). 

Figure3: Prof. Guy Ziv facilitating discussion regarding opportunities and barriers to implementation of suggested agri-environment contracts
Figure3: Prof. Guy Ziv facilitating discussion regarding opportunities and barriers to implementation of suggested agri-environment contracts

Participants also stated that the short duration of contracts and the opportunity to receive advice and support during the application and implementation phases are critical to the success of a contract and would influence the choice of contract. In addition, participants expressed a strong interest in attracting private/commercial funding, but it seems to be difficult to obtain or find partners interested in investing in such initiatives.

Synthesis of opinions to implement suggested contract solutions and lessons learned

D3.3 Synthesis of opinions to implement suggested contract solutions and lessons learned

Author/ s: Hamunen, K., Haltia, E., Kurttila, M., Leppänen, J., Tarvainen, O., Viitala, E-

Filiation: LUKE

Contributors: Andreoli, M., Bartolini, F., Bertolozzi, D., Berzina, I., Bradfield, T., Canaj, E., Cosgrove, M., D’Alberto, R., De Geromino, G., Dupraz, P., Eichhorn, T., Harmanny, K., Hennessy, T., Holden, J., Issanchou, A., Malak-Rawlikowska, A., Nikolov, D., Olivieri, M., Paillard, H., Runge, T., Schaller, L., Schulp, N., Tyllianakis, E., Viaggi, D., Vergamini, D.

Summary

Land managers could be offered diffrent types of contracts to increase provision of agri-environmental climate public goods (AECPGs). CONSOLE project has focus on four novel contrac solutions (result-based contracts, contract solutions fostering collective implementation, value chain-based contract solutions, and land tenure contracts). The aim of this deliverable is gather stakeholders’ views on potential challenges and solutions when implementing novel contract solutions.
According to the results of stakeholder workshops, land managers’ willingness to participate in different contracts types depends on how well the contract type is known. Therefore, continuous information sharing on different types of contracts are important. It is important to raise both land managers’ and extension specialists’ awareness on AECPG provision and the possibilities to combine provision with existing production. Possibilities of hybrid solutions (i.e., combinations of more than one contract type) and participation of private sector need to be studied and developed further.
In result-based contracts sufficient economic compensation is the basic prerequisite for increasing their uptake. Land managers need to have a clear picture of the economic consequences of the contract. Risk of not achieving the result could be reduced with gradual compensation payments and partial pre- remuneration. Defining suitable, science-based monitoring indicators that land managers can influence, and that are easy to monitor, is important. In an ideal situation, the same indicators could be used to measure different agri- environmental benefits (e.g., biodiversity, water, carbon). Self-monitoring could increase land managers’ motivation for result-based contracts.
To increase the uptake of collective contracts, it is important to ensure fair and transparent distribution of compensation between participating land managers. Collective contracts often need a leader or intermediary to gather the land managers together. The private sector has huge potential especially in value chain contracts. To increase the uptake of value chain contracts, there is a need to investigate existing and potential chains, support private organisations to engage, and define fair distribution of benefits, responsibilities, and risks. One of the main issues in land tenure contracts is the lack of available land for rent.
Moreover, stakeholders were concerned about too strong a power of the landowner that reduces tenants’ willingness to participate.

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